s
SHARE

Top 10 Tips for Residential HVAC Sales People in 2018

Posted by Steve Gadsby on September 21, 2018
Top 10 Tips for Residential HVAC Sales People in 2018 HVAC Sales in 2018

Selling to consumers in the residential HVAC market has changed over the last 10 years. The days of formality in a sale are fading away and consumers now are going with companies that can show the most transparency and connect better during a sale.  

I sold my HVAC company in 2017 following rapid growth for a decade. I think any HVAC company could duplicate our results for their own business. We were not satisfied with the commonly accepted HVAC sales wisdom at the time and we set about creating our own set of rules that worked for us. I would credit the growth to a unique set of sales philosophies we adopted. We constantly tested various sales principals – their success or failure would be reflected in our cumulative closing percentage. Here were the most important of those principals:

  • Every sale that is attended must be treated as if its sellable. It’s so easy to discredit the sale before arriving. Behaving as though it is possible to sell every job will help you focus the cause of a lost sale at yourself. Even if your wrong – you’ll be 10x more likely to learn something or adjust how you behave at a future sale to increase your closing percentage. Oftentimes you’ll find by asking yourself the question “How could I have performed better on that sale” you will get an answer. By listening to yourself you will improve over time. 
  • Always blame yourself – not externals for lost sales. Common excuses sales people say are “it is the wrong time of the year to sell X equipment”, “it’s the wrong customer type”, or “the customer has too many quotes” etc. Again, but cutting off the ability to blame externals – your left with only blaming yourself for lost sales which will result in continuous improvement.
  • I believe HVAC sales people should be truly neutral about what the customer buys. By that I mean if you have a product comparison sheet the HVAC sales person should neutrally go over the various products discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each product. If the salesperson goes in with a predetermined agenda to sell the most expensive equipment, customers will sense it and it will ultimately hurt the closing percentage.
  • As a salesperson of relatively expensive merchandise and working inside someone’s home you are ultimately selling trust - customers are constantly analyzing everything you say and do to see if they can trust you. There is only one way to be trusted – be a good trustable person who does what they say they will do and always acts with integrity.
  • They are buying you, they are only partially buying your product. People are intuitive, if you are truly someone who would never deceive the customer, never lie to them and are trustable - people will sense it. You cannot fake this - if you find sales are poor - look at yourself first. You can’t manipulate customers.
  • The simplest rule here… never, ever lie to someone. I.e – don’t say you got a flat tire if your late to a sale. Just tell the truth – you scheduled your day poorly or whatever the real reason is. There is never a reason to lie about anything – your sales will be boosted by being up front all the time.
  • Having a good connection with the customer is critical – it’s the most important part of the initial sales consultation. It gives the customer time to get comfortable with you and you with them. You get energy in sales when you sense they trust you and you connect. Good energy in sales you can take to the bank.
  • Never, ever bash competitors. Even if you know the competitor is incompetent or worse. The moment you try to discredit the competition to the customer it makes you look worse.
  • It truly does take a lot of energy to close a sale well - if we don’t put the effort in the opportunities won’t appear. When we can keep our energy and optimism up in a sale opportunities will present themselves in a sale that wouldn’t have otherwise shown up.
  • Always at least try and close the sale. The customer being asked for their business is the cost of you coming out there. You can be very polite about it – I.e. “If you want, we have a spot open next Wednesday – would that work for you” – however you must ask at least once. Getting the sale is similar to golf - you always try to get it in the hole which will at worst leave you closer to putting it in in the future.

As a basic set of sales ‘principals’ the above rules served us well during my first business and are continuing to serve me well at my new business FurnaceUSA. I’m sure these principals will evolve and grow over the years but the core reasoning behind them will stay the same.

 

Steve Gadsby,

Owner, FurnaceUSA

www.FurnaceUSA.com

Comments
Add a new blog comment!

Enter your comments in the box below:

(Please note that all blog entries and comments are subject to review prior to posting.)

 

While we will do our best to monitor all comments and blog posts for accuracy and relevancy, Home Energy is not responsible for content posted by our readers or third parties. Home Energy reserves the right to edit or remove comments or blog posts that do not meet our community guidelines.

Recent Blogs
Top 10 Tips for Residential HVAC Sales People in 2018

Top 10 Tips for Residential HVAC Sales People in 2018

Steve Gadsby

Selling to consumers in the residential HVAC market has changed over the last 10 years. The days of formality in a sale are fading away and consumers now are going with companies that can show the most transparency and connect better during a sale.   [continue reading]

More

More "Buzz" from ACEEE Summer Study—The Invisible Energy Mortgages in New Homes

Jim Gunshinan for Leo Ranier, LBNL

You probably never considered the power consumption of those Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupter outlets (fondly known as GFCIs) in bathrooms, kitchens, and other residential wet spots. But Leo Rainer and his colleagues did and they measured them.  He also measured hard-wired smoke alarms, Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs) and a host of other devices that health and safety codes require in new homes.  Ventilation fans and radon fans—which are required to run continuously--are especially high ... [continue reading]

Two National Brands Join Forces Demonstrating Unity in Home Energy-Efficiency Rating Systems

Two National Brands Join Forces Demonstrating Unity in Home Energy-Efficiency Rating Systems

Lindsay Bachman

The Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) and Pearl Certification are now collaborating to ensure that the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index and Pearl Certification Reports complement each other in the new and existing homes markets. [continue reading]

Summer Season Highlights on Home Performance in the States

Summer Season Highlights on Home Performance in the States

Joe Cullen, HPC Director of Policy and Outreach

Although the Summer Season is quickly coming to an end, HPC has seen an unusual amount of positive activity in the states on residential energy efficiency policy – with more deadlines and activities coming through the end of August. HPC and its allies have been particularly active in the following states: [continue reading]

The Leading Edge in the Nation's Capitol

The Leading Edge in the Nation's Capitol

Lindsay Bachman

Nick knows homes. Several years ago, he started volunteering for Habitat for Humanity. He also helped modify a home that was part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon, a competition for students to design and build high performance buildings powered by renewable energy. On top of that, he’s built six passive houses. So when Nick decided to create an addition to his own home in Washington DC, he ... [continue reading]

The Consumer Connection: A Consumer-Centric Approach to Delivering Home Energy Services

The Consumer Connection: A Consumer-Centric Approach to Delivering Home Energy Services

Laurie Guevara-Stone

Two-thirds of US homeowners consider home energy performance a top priority, but few actually take action to improve home energy use. And those who have implemented efficiency improvements seldom invest in whole-home energy upgrades. In sum, a large gap exists between intentions and actual investments, signifying a market failure to address customer needs. Rocky Mountain Institute set out to understand why the market is failing to convert more homeowner interest in energy efficiency into action ... [continue reading]

Two Friends of Summer Study

Two Friends of Summer Study

Jim Gunshinan

The following profile first appeared in the Grapevine, a daily newsletter produced by Home Energy Magazine staff at the biannual ACEEE Summer Study in Buildings, heald at the beautiful Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California. [continue reading]

DOE Housing Innovation Awards Announced

DOE Housing Innovation Awards Announced

Jim Gunshinan

Since 2013, The DOE Housing Innovation Awards have honored the very best in innovation on the path to zero energy ready homes by recognizing forward-thinking builders who are delivering American homebuyers with a better homeowner experience. Explore these award-winning homes on the Tour of Zero. [continue reading]

 She Cut Her Energy Bills by 69% & Got to Pearl Gold

She Cut Her Energy Bills by 69% & Got to Pearl Gold

Lindsay Bachman

When discussing cutting energy consumption, but still staying cool in the hot summer months in Arizona, Jan tells her clients to first get an energy audit. "That's going to be a whole system approach to looking at every facet of your home.” The energy audit will check "insulation, windows, the efficiency of appliances, things like that, especially your HVAC system," explained Jan in the Taking Action part of ABC15 morning news. Jan explained that ... [continue reading]

Buzz from Presentations at ACEEE Summer Study

Buzz from Presentations at ACEEE Summer Study

Jim Gunshinan for Danny Parker, Florida Solar Energy Center

Reducing energy use for heating hot water remains a major challenge around the world. This paper describes a novel solar photovoltaic assisted heat pump water heater (PV-HPWH) which achieved an 83% reduction (COP 5.4) in water heating energy compared with electric resistance. This technology demonstrates very large potential energy savings around the U.S. [continue reading]

Earn BPI CEU credits
HEP
Home Performance with EnergyStar
SPONSORED CONTENT Home Diagnosis: The First TV Series about Home Energy! Learn more! Watch Video
Email Newsletter

Home Energy E-Newsletter

Sign up for our free monthly
E-Newsletter!

Harness the power of
HOME PERFORMANCE!

Get the Home Energy
e-newsletter

FREE!

SUBSCRIBE

NOW!