Storm Windows Save Energy

July/August 2000
This article originally appeared in the July/August 2000 issue of Home Energy Magazine.
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July 01, 2000
Although new, high-performance windows are the ideal, simply putting up storm windows in the wintertime can be a very effective alternative.
        Putting up storm windows on an older home can do more than simply protect the windows from storm damage, and even more than cut down on conductive heat loss. It can also significantly reduce air  infiltration. This fact was recently demonstrated by a team of researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who fitted two single-glazed, double-hung sash windows with storm windows, put the assemblies in a simulated weather chamber, and measured air pressure and temperatures on both sides of each assembly for a period of 30 days. The results showed that air infiltration is indeed reduced with storm window additions.         The researchers began this project with the goal of improving how National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) energy analysis software accounts for the addition of storm windows. According to NEAT developer Mike Gettings, previous versions of the software analyzed storm windows only on the basis of conductive heat transfer. Version 7.0, which at press time was expected to be released in beta version in June 2000, will also incorporate air infiltration as a variable in the analysis equations. (Radiative heat transfer, incidentally, is already accounted for in the software and didn&...

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